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When everyone has a home

Housing advice for Northern Ireland

Advice for landlords

In certain circumstances, the council can revoke your HMO licence.

This video explains some of the things landlords who rent out property in Northern Ireland must do to follow the law.  

Under the new HMO regime, HMO owners and managers must deal with anti-social behaviour much more proactively. You must have a policy or plan to deal with any anti-social behaviour caused by or affecting the people living in your HMO.

The council can issue a suitability notice if it believes that the HMO is not suitable for the number or type of occupants.

A repairs grant is available to help cover the cost of carrying out repairs required after your local council has issued a Notice of Disrepair on a protected tenancy or a Public Health Notice on any other property. You can get up to £7,500 depending on the type of work needed.

When you communicate with your tenants you need to ensure that you do so in an appropriate and timely manner. If your tenants have literacy issues or do not speak English, you will need to consider how you can effectively communicate with them.

There are some legal documents which you must provide to your tenants. Failure to provide certain documents to your tenants can result in prosecution and a hefty fine.

Depending on the value of the property either the landlord or the tenant can be held liable for rates in a rented property. You should be very clear on who is liable for rates and should have procedures in place to ensure that these are paid. Rates must also be paid on properties which are vacant.

You are not required to serve a Notice to Quit to bring a fixed term agreement to an end, but you should write to your tenants to find out whether they intend to stay in the property or move on. Finding out your existing tenants' intentions will help minimise the risk of void months, where no rent is paid.

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