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When everyone has a home

Housing advice for Northern Ireland

Bad housing

It's easy to be won over by a nicely decorated property, but you need to be sensible when deciding where to live. Consider your household's needs carefully and assess whether the location, size and style of the property suit these. You should also check the property thoroughly for signs of disrepair which may cause issues once you're living in the property.

It can be tempting to stop paying rent if you feel the property you are renting is not up to standard or the landlord is not sticking to the tenancy agreement. This is a risky procedure as your landlord may try to evict you if you stop paying rent.

At some point in your tenancy, something in the property will probably need to be repaired. Your tenancy agreement should explain what type of repairs your landlord is responsible for and what repairs you are expected to carry out yourself.

All housing in Northern Ireland has to pass a basic fitness standard. The council can help private tenants who are living in bad housing. 

You should give your landlord a reasonable amount of time to carry out repairs. If you are having difficulty contacting your landlord or your landlord has refused to carry out essential repairs you may be able to get help from your local council.

In recent years, some tenants have experienced serious problems in their properties due to extreme frost, wind and snow. There are certain actions you can take to minimise the risks to both you and your property if bad weather has been predicted.

Points are important when you are waiting for a home. Lots of points means you will be higher up on the waiting list. 

The law gives you certain rights if you rent from the Housing Executive. You have more rights if you are a secure tenant than you do if you are an introductory tenant. 

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