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When everyone has a home

Housing advice for Northern Ireland

Landlord best practice

It's important that you keep up to date with changes in housing legislation, policy and practice to make sure that you are operating within the law. You may wish to consider taking part in an accredited training programme or joining a professional body. This type of training and support could help you deal with any problems that arise with your tenants and help you manage your properties effectively.

All landlords in Northern Ireland have to submit their details to a central register. Landlords of Houses in Multiple Occupation also need to register with the Housing Executive. Landlords should also consider joining an organisation that can provide professional support and advice to landlords.

Your house needs to be up to certain standards before it can be rented out. You may need to ask the council to inspect your property and will have to abide by certain safety requirements.

Any deposits taken on or after 1 April 2013 must be registered with an authorised Tenancy Deposit Protection Scheme administrator. Deposits taken before that date don't need to be registered with one of these schemes.

All landlords in Northern Ireland have to submit their details to a central register. Landlords of Houses in Multiple Occupation also need to register with the Housing Executive. Landlords should also consider joining an organisation that can provide professional support and advice to landlords.

You are expected to maintain the property to a certain standard and are usually obliged to carry out certain repairs.

It's important that you keep up to date with changes in housing legislation, policy and practice to make sure that you are operating within the law. You may wish to consider taking part in an accredited training programme or joining a professional body. This type of training and support could help you deal with any problems that arise with your tenants and help you manage your properties effectively.

Your tenants have a legal right to know your name, address and telephone number. If you have paid for the services of an agent, but your tenants have decided to contact you directly, you should talk to your tenants to find out why. The agent may not be providing the services you are paying them for or may not be carrying out their legal obligations.

Your house needs to be up to certain standards before it can be rented out. You may need to ask the council to inspect your property and will have to abide by certain safety requirements.

When a tenant is late with rent or hasn't paid, it can have a huge effect on your own finances. Contact your tenants as soon as possible to discuss any arrears, as there may be a valid reason for them.

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