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When everyone has a home

Housing advice for Northern Ireland

Landlord repairs

You should report any damage or disrepair to your landlord immediately. It's always a good idea to follow up any reports you make over the phone or in person with a letter so both you and your landlord have a record of any work that needs to be done.

You should report any damage or disrepair to your landlord immediately. It's always a good idea to follow up any reports you make over the phone or in person with a letter so both you and your landlord have a record of any work that needs to be done.

A repairs grant is available to help cover the cost of carrying out repairs required after your local council has issued a Notice of Disrepair on a protected tenancy or a Public Health Notice on any other property. You can get up to £7,500 depending on the type of work needed.

It's easy to be won over by a nicely decorated property, but you need to be sensible when deciding where to live. Consider your household's needs carefully and assess whether the location, size and style of the property suit these. You should also check the property thoroughly for signs of disrepair which may cause issues once you're living in the property.

Most housing associations have a Right to Repair scheme for their tenants. The point of these schemes is to make sure that tenants can get low cost, urgent repairs done quickly.

At some point in your tenancy, something in the property will probably need to be repaired. Your tenancy agreement should explain what type of repairs your landlord is responsible for and what repairs you are expected to carry out yourself.

There is a fitness standard that all privately rented accommodation must meet. If the state of your home is making you ill or causing a public health issue, there are agencies you can contact who can make your landlord carry out repairs. The fitness standard is quite low so often only homes in serious disrepair will fail to meet this.

You are expected to maintain the property to a certain standard and are usually obliged to carry out certain repairs.

You should give your landlord a reasonable amount of time to carry out repairs. If you are having difficulty contacting your landlord or your landlord has refused to carry out essential repairs you may be able to get help from your local council.

Generally, you will be liable for any repairs to the structure of the property and furnishings which were supplied with the letting and the tenants will be liable for repairs to their own items or for repairing any damage which is their fault. You should specify repairing obligations in your tenancy agreement.

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